Super high resolution camera from Fujitsu: CG-511PA1V for 24-hour operation
Super high resolution camera from Fujitsu: CG-511PA1V for 24-hour operation

If we’re talking about top technology in CCTV cameras, then we can’t ignore the new super high-resolution cameras from Fujitsu: the CG-532PA1V colour camera and the CG-511PA1V day/night camera with an extremely high resolution of 540 TV lines, so that important details such as car registrations or faces can be identified even more easily. The CG-511PA1V day/night camera with a 1/3” Sony Super HAD Interline Transfer CCD was specially developed for 24-hour operation.  It switches automatically from day/night and has a tilting IR filter.  The detect time of the day/night function can be selected.  The filter shifts when the change of the brightness level is constant for the selected time period (5 or 30 sec.).  This is extremely useful especially in twilight situations.  The Auto Blemish function automatically recognises and compensates for up to 32 faulty pixels.  Combined with a light sensitivity of 0.8 lux (colour) and 0.1 lux (B/W), this means that previously unobtainable image quality can now be achieved. The CG-532 has the same professional features as the CG-511 – apart from the day/night camera specification: in addition to automatic gain control (AGC), eclipser/flicker-free switching, back-light compensation (BLC) and cable-length compensation (accentuation of video signal), there is also a privacy masking function. Both cameras can be set up as desired using the OSD menu navigation (camera set-up, AWB, Chroma, Sync., ESC etc.). In addition, they are also available as 12VDC/24VAC and 230VAC versions respectively.

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Multifunctional and ready for anything
Multifunctional and ready for anything

The new Fujitsu CG-301PA1V Day/Night Digital Camera with switchable IR Cut Filter and Wide Dynamic Range combines the advantages of several Fujitsu cameras into a single model, including those of the CG-202 WDR Camera and the CG-311PA1V Day/Night Camera: it delivers outstanding results in difficult lighting conditions, such as with backlight, and it automatically switches into black/white mode in bad light or bad visibility. In the Casino Mode, as it is called, the CG-301 has been optimised to match the special conditions found in casinos.  This means that it complies with the strict legal criteria for video surveillance in public gaming rooms, and it ensures that the picture quality is perfect – even under the special lighting conditions found in gaming establishments.In addition to the bundled Remote Software, further attractive features include Auto Blemish Compensation and Electronic Zoom (x2.5), External Day/Night Selection, Back Light Compensation (BLC), Automatic White Balance (AWB), Internal or Networked Synchronisation as well as a Flickerless Function round off this package perfectly. Fujitsu CG-301PA1V features: 1/3” Day/Night Multifunction Camera Wide Dynamic Range (WDR): 60dB (Sony SSII Chip Set) Switchable IR Cut Filter with "Detect Time" Function On-screen Menu Control / Camera Title Display Sensitivity of 0.025Lux at F1.2 (DSS/Colour) Scene Select Function (Inside, Outside, Casino) Back Light Compensation (BLC) / Zone Masking High and Low Speed Shutter Control (ESC/DSS) Auto Blemish Compensation (up to 10 Pixels) 2.5x Digital Zoom and Flickerless Function Automatic White Balance with Hold Function (AWB) External Day/Night Selection / RS-485 Interface Supply Voltage 12VDC or 24VAC

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CCTV cameras - Expert commentary

The benefits and challenges of in-camera audio analytics for surveillance solutions
The benefits and challenges of in-camera audio analytics for surveillance solutions

Audio is often overlooked in the security and video surveillance industry. There are some intercom installations where audio plays a key role, but it’s not typically thought about when it comes to security and event management. Audio takes a back seat in many security systems because audio captured from a surveillance camera can have a different impact on the privacy of those being monitored. Audio surveillance is therefore subject to strict laws that vary from state to state. Many states require a clearly posted sign indicating audio recording is taking place in an area before a person enters. Analytic information derived from audio can be a useful tool and when implemented correctly, removes any concerns over privacy or legal compliance. Audio analytics on the edge overcomes legal challenges as it never passes audio outside of the camera Focused responses to events Audio analytics processed in the camera, has been a niche and specialised area for many installers and end users. This could be due to state laws governing audio recording, however, audio analytics on the edge overcomes legal challenges as it never passes audio outside of the camera Processing audio analytics in-camera provides excellent privacy since audio data is analysed internally with a set of algorithms that only compare and assess the audio content. Processing audio analytics on the edge also reduces latency compared with any system that needs to send the raw audio to an on-premises or cloud server for analysis. Audio analytics can quickly pinpoint zones that security staff should focus on, which can dramatically shorten response times to incidents. Audio-derived data also provides a secondary layer of verification that an event is taking place which can help prioritise responses from police and emergency personnel. Having a SoC allows a manufacturer to reserve space for specialised features, and for audio analytics, a database of reference sounds is needed for comparison Microphones and algorithms Many IP-based cameras have small microphones embedded in the housing while some have a jack for connecting external microphones to the camera. Microphones on indoor cameras work well since the housing allows for a small hole to permit sound waves to reach the microphone. Outdoor cameras that are IP66 certified against water and dust ingress will typically have less sensitivity since the microphone is not exposed. In cases like these, an outdoor microphone, strategically placed, can significantly improve outdoor analytic accuracy. There are several companies that make excellent directional microphones for outdoor use, some of which can also combat wind noise. Any high-quality external microphone should easily outperform a camera’s internal microphone in terms of analytic accuracy, so it is worth considering in areas where audio information gathering is deemed most important. In-built audio-video analytics Surveillance cameras with a dedicated SoC (System on Chip) have become available in recent years with in-built video and audio analytics that can detect and classify audio events and send alerts to staff and emergency for sounds such as gunshots, screams, glass breaks and explosions. Having a SoC allows a manufacturer to reserve space for specialised features. For audio analytics, a database of reference sounds is needed for comparison. The camera extracts the characteristics of the audio source collected using the camera's internal or externally connected microphone and calculates its likelihood based on the pre-defined database. If a match is found for a known sound, e.g., gunshot, explosion, glass break, or scream, an event is triggered, and the message is passed to the VMS. If a match is found for a known sound, e.g., gunshot, explosion, glass break, or scream, an event is triggered, and the message is passed to the VMS Configuring a camera for audio analytics Audio detectionThe first job of a well-configured camera or camera/mic pair is to detect sounds of interest while rejecting ancillary sounds and noise below a preset threshold. Each camera must be custom configured for its particular environment to detect audio levels which exceed a user-defined level. Since audio levels are typically greater in abnormal situations, any audio levels exceeding the baseline set levels are detected as being a potential security event. Operators can be notified of any abnormal situations via event signals allowing the operator to take suitable measures. Finding a baseline of background noise and setting an appropriate threshold level is the first step. Installers should be able to enable or disable the noise reduction function and view the results to validate the optimum configuration during setup Noise reductionA simple threshold level may not be adequate enough to reduce false alarms depending on the environment where a camera or microphone is installed. Noise reduction is a feature on cameras that can reduce background noise greater than 55dB-65dB for increased detection accuracy. Installers should be able to enable or disable the noise reduction function and view the results to validate the optimum configuration during setup. With noise reduction enabled, the system analyses the attenuated audio source. As such, the audio source classification performance may be hindered or generate errors, so it is important to use noise reduction technology sparingly. Audio source classificationIt’s important to supply the analytic algorithm with a good audio level and a high signal-to-noise ratio to reduce the chance of generating false alarms under normal circumstances. Installers should experiment with ideal placement for both video as well as audio. While a ceiling corner might seem an ideal location for a camera, it might also cause background audio noise to be artificially amplified. Many cameras provide a graph which visualises audio source levels to allow for the intuitive checking of noise cancellation and detection levels. Analytics take privacy concerns out of the equation and allow installers and end users to use camera audio responsibly Messages and eventsIt’s important to choose a VMS that has correctly integrated the camera’s API (application programming interface) in order to receive comprehensive audio analytic events that include the classification ID (explosion, glass break, gunshot, scream). A standard VMS that only supports generic alarms, may not be able to resolve all of the information. More advanced VMS solutions can identify different messages from the camera. Well configured audio analytics can deliver critical information about a security event, accelerating response times and providing timely details beyond video-only surveillance. Analytics take privacy concerns out of the equation and allow installers and end users to use camera audio responsibly. Hanwha Techwin's audio source classification technology, available in its X Series cameras, features three customisable settings for category, noise cancellation and detection level for optimum performance in a variety of installation environments.

Integration of surveillance and video management solutions for safer cities
Integration of surveillance and video management solutions for safer cities

A deep native integration of Bosch cameras with software from ISS proactively catalyses the best in security and surveillance, while providing advanced intelligent video tools. ISS SecurOS provides intelligent enterprise video management solutions with emphasis on providing scalability and flexibility to meet the customer’s needs. Deeply integrating built-in video analytics from Bosch cameras improves operator efficiency and situational awareness to manage complex environments. ISS SecurOS maximises camera performance for license plate recognition, face recognition, and container/train carriages recognition. The cameras meet the performance needs for advanced analytics, ensuring the success of projects and saving time, resources, and cost. The partnership has delivered multi-thousand-camera safe city deployments, industrial analytics solutions, and systems for large-scale transport providers. The usage of roads and parking lots can be managed more effectively by knowing the whereabouts of each vehicle License plate capture The usage of roads and parking lots can be managed more effectively by knowing the whereabouts of each and every vehicle. Operations managers are accountable for efficient logistical flows and effective use of roads and parking lots. Knowing the ins and outs of the transport infrastructure and what’s going on at all times provides the knowledge required to ensure operations are running safely, efficiently and in compliance with the rules and laws. An important part of this comes from monitoring which vehicles are entering an area and ensuring they are allowed to be there. Capturing license plates of every vehicle moving in an area provides knowledge of traffic flows and usage patterns. Such a solution should also allow a customer to easily configure and manage monitoring preferences and permit easy data exchanges with other operational management systems and services to manage an infrastructure and logistics as a whole. Reliable license plate data Robust mechanical design of cameras ensures reliable 24/7 operation for many years even in harsh environments As transportation infrastructures are often operating around the clock, reliable vehicle identification data is required 24/7. This means that the cameras capturing this data should work in all lighting and weather conditions, for both slow- and fast-moving vehicles. Cameras must be built to produce usable images 24/7 in all weather conditions. For quality license plate recognition in both day and night, the cameras make use of supplementary infrared light. A special License Plate Recognition (LPR) mode, developed in collaboration with LPR software, delivers readable license plates even with glaring headlights and with fast moving vehicles. Robust mechanical design of cameras ensures reliable 24/7 operation for many years even in harsh environments. License Plate Capture solution The SecurOSTM AUTO system of ISS, when used with Bosch cameras, provides easy to deploy solutions for all of these requirements. It recognises license plates from many countries, manages and matches white, hot and blacklists and notifies the operator either in the GUI or through a messaging interface to other management systems. Additionally, the system can be used and managed as a standalone or embedded in other management systems on the premises.

HD over Coax provides cost-effective video surveillance upgrade
HD over Coax provides cost-effective video surveillance upgrade

According to IHS Market, it is estimated that there are over 60 million security cameras in the United States, and other reports say these cameras capture more than four billion hours of footage per week. Over the last decade, IP camera technology has dominated the conversation as it has provided users with a broad offering of enhanced image quality and features. With a large percentage of existing security systems relying on analogue, many end users looking for high definition (HD) video quality have been forced to take on a complete system overhaul. Infrastructure overhaul for HD video To make the switch, customers would need to change everything, from cameras to hardware to wiring– not to mention the lengthy installation process that would ensue. IP cameras also require higher Internet speeds and more cloud space. Whether constrained by budget, bandwidth or storage, many end users have been unable to adopt this new video surveillance method.Thanks to technological advancements within the security industry, HD over Coax offers a viable solution for integrators and end users alike Thanks to technological advancements within the security industry, HD over Coax offers a viable solution for integrators and end users alike. By utilising the current Coaxial cables, this offering yields high definition video, while requiring minimal infrastructure changes and is an optimal surveillance choice for security customers. Plus, with new advancements and updates being made frequently to this technology, there is a solution for every security need. The enhanced alternative of HD over Coax has been warmly welcomed in the security industry, thanks to its simple solutions and ever-evolving features. Many new analogue HD cameras are “plug and play,” able to connect directly to existing Coaxial cables. This eliminates the need for a complete system change, creating cost-savings for the end user and an enhanced video quality offering. Easy solutions for HD video As a result, integrators can cost-effectively upgrade their customer’s surveillance solution while using their legacy infrastructure, making it an attractive option for end users and an easy sell for dealers. Latency in video is another common issue with network-based camera systems, where even the slightest delay in video surveillance can hinder security response HD over Coax cameras themselves are always expanding and evolving to meet a wide array of security needs. With the introduction of fisheye and multi-sensor cameras, users now have a multitude of coverage options, not to mention the introduction of 4K bringing resolution options to the same level as IP. Some newer technologies are even touting 4K cameras paired with 4K digital video recorders (DVRs) made specifically for analogue systems. Longer cables grant transmission for up to 1600 feet, double the distance of standard analogue solutions, and triple that of IP systems. This single cable is able to transmit both HD video and audio. Recently, broadcast quality audio over Coax has become available in limited models, a substantial improvement over older analogue technology, which was unable to transmit audio. Stopping video delay Latency in video is another common issue with network-based camera systems. Even the slightest delay in video surveillance can hinder security response. IP cameras are forced to compress and packetise their video for transmission. The outcome of this is a reduced number of images per video, which in turn causes delay. HD over Coax on the other hand, delivers an unlimited amount of HD images in real time, with smooth motion and impressive clarity. Additionally, the point-to-point transmission delivers uncompressed video free of lag. Another touted benefit is that, unlike IP networked cameras, analogue systems provide a more secure video transmission. With so much sensitive information housed on a businesses’ network, adding another point of network access through an IP camera can create concerns for cyber security risks. HD over Coax delivers an unlimited amount of HD images in real time, with smooth motion and impressive clarity Preventing network hacking With HD over Coax, the physical connections between the camera and DVR prevent network hacking. By keeping the video surveillance system offline, security professionals are able to direct their attention to the physical threats at hand, rather than having to focus on deterring cyber security risks. One of the primary difficulties of deploying HD video solutions is the fact that many older systems utilise a wide variety of HD standards and platforms. To make matters more complicated, after HD over Coax was brought to market, manufacturers raced to create their own version of this technology. Today, the most popular proprietary standards are HD-CVI, HD-TVI and AHD. However, integrators and customers found that attempting to manage multiple HD technologies proved to be near impossible.Integrators and customers found that attempting to manage multiple HD technologies proved to be near impossible Diversifying surveillance through one DVR To combat these issues, manufacturers have introduced products with more flexibility to their portfolios. One example of this is the penta-brid DVR which grants the ability to seamlessly integrate multiple technologies deployed across one application. This means that systems with diverse camera brands and technologies, such as a mix of HD-CVI, HD-TVI, AHD, analogue or IP, can be connected through one DVR. For many end users with legacy analogue systems, penta-brid DVRs give them greater freedom to choose between a variety of solutions, rather than being limited to one option. With video resolution increasing, the space needed to store the footage is similarly rising. Penta-brid technology has been able to adapt to these evolving needs, giving users ample storage space to house the HD and 4K surveillance video with some of the newest models including H.265 compression.  HD casino surveillance made simple For casinos, HD images are critical for identifying unauthorised personnel and unlawful behaviours to create a safe environment for guests and staff While HD over Coax is beneficial to many end users and integrators, those in the casino and hospitality markets find it crucial. With a combination of high profile guests, large amounts of cash on hand, constant crowds and strict industry regulations, reliable video surveillance is a must. Deploying new IP systems comes at a stiff price. When looking to upgrade their video surveillance, casinos must also be mindful of the installation process. When moving to an IP-based system, ripping out old wires and replacing them with new is the standard practice. This practice can be both disruptive and costly, not to mention gaming regulations require casino activities be monitored at all times so a complete system shutdown would result in revenue loss. This cost can be hard to justify, especially when the current legacy analogue system remains in working condition with only the lower image resolution to date it. For these scenarios, the most cost-effective option is to leverage the legacy infrastructure, replace the existing cameras with new devices, and reap the benefits that HD video has to offer without any lapse in security. For casinos, HD images are critical for identifying unauthorised personnel and unlawful behaviours to create a safe environment for guests and staff. HD over Coax cameras now offer the same resolution as IP cameras with a plug and play approach, that cuts down on expense without sacrificing quality. For businesses and applications that are unable to adopt IP technology, whether it be cost or time prohibitive, HD over Coax now features most of the same benefits IP has to offer without breaking the bank. By providing clear images in real time, maximising existing infrastructure, and affording cyber security benefits, HD over Coax provides an attractive solution for many end users and integrators.